The Gate - Twickenham Stadium Hospitality

The perfect union of steak, wine and rugby

Once a ruck has formed players wanting to gather or protect the ball must do so through an area called The Gate.

Enter The Gate restaurant through the private entrance, join friends and enjoy all that this excellent chop-house has to offer.

A flexible and private, chop-house styled hospitality experience at its best and the perfect place to appreciate a combination of quality cuts of meat and fine wines paired to the opposition, together with the passion and pride of international rugby.

TO EAT

  • A four course Chop house style menu with wine and food matched to the opposition
  • A selection of post-match cheese

TO DRINK

  • Comprehensive bar including Champagne, real ales (selection), Guinness and premium lager with wine selected by our sommelier
  • Half time drinks served in the restaurant
  • Complimentary bar 60 minutes post-match

YOUR VIEW

  • East Stand, Lower tier, within the 22s

CLOSER TO THE ACTION

  • Near halfway line
  • Direct suite to seat access

DINING STYLE

  • Private tables of two+
  • Open kitchens looking into the heart of the action
  • Range of high and low tables

INCLUSIVE FEATURES

  • Meet, greet and socialise with past players pre/post-match
  • Bar area with TV’s
  • Facility opens 3.5 hours before kick-off and closes 1.5 hours after match finishes

England v New Zealand

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